Catholic Archbishop Burke calls for pressure on fellow bishops, then recants (sort of)

This is plain weird.

Yesterday, Randall Terry, the longtime anti-abortion activist, held a news conference at the National Press Conference in Washington to share a videotaped interview he did with Archbishop Raymond Burke, formerly of St. Louis and now head of the Vatican supreme court in Rome.

In the videotape, Burke takes the very unusual step of urging pro-lifers to press U.S. bishops to withhold Communion from Catholic politicians who are pro-choice.

Burke seemed to be calling many of his fellow bishops on the carpet.

You can see a video of the interview HERE in two parts.

Today, National Catholic Reporter is saying that Burke has released a statement apologizing for his comments. So far, I can’t find the statement anywhere. ADD: HERE IT IS.

NCR says that Burke says that he only gave the interview to Terry “to share with pro-life workers.” Burke says that Terry’s use of the interview, as part of a media campaign to put pressure on bishops, is “objectionable.”

NCR says Burke’s statement includes this: “If I had known what the true purpose of the interview was, I would never have agreed to participate in it.”

What am I missing here? Is Burke saying that he wants people to put pressure on bishops to withhold Communion — but he doesn’t want the bishops know he takes this stand?

What is another way to interpret this?

Gary Stern

Gary Stern covered education in the Lower Hudson Valley for several years during the early 1990s. Now's he back on the beat. He believes that schools are one of the main reasons that people live around here and that educational issues -- from curriculum to financing -- are among the most challenging things that journalists can write about. He continues to be amazed by the complexity of educational jargon. Gary got his B.A. at SUNY Buffalo and his M.A. from the University of Missouri Journalism School (where his master's thesis was about the best ways to cover education). He lives in White Plains with his wife and two sons, who attend public schools.