Introducing…the Westchester Jewish Council

The Westchester Jewish Conference, a venerable consortium of synagogues and Jewish groups from across the county, has decided to rename itself.

The conference has become a council, the Westchester Jewish Council.

According to a statement: “The change was made to better reflect the Jewish community relations council function of the organization, and to bring the name into alignment with its 100 sister organizations nationwide.  This name change is the first step in a major new effort to more dynamically portray the organization in all communications and interactions with the community.”

Fair enough.

Council President Ronald E. Burton explains:  “We felt that WJC deserved a ‘larger’ name; the word ‘Council’ sounded good to us from the first time we tried it.   So far, the response from the public has been overwhelmingly positive.  To me, it reflects this notion of well-intentioned people sitting around the table for the common good of the Westchester Jewish community – that’s not only the hope, but it’s also the expectation – it’s what we do.”

The group also notes that the word “conference” makes one think of a regular or semi-regular gathering of people, and the group is clearly more than that.

The WJC’s website, which does not yet reflect the new name, notes that the group was once known as the Jewish Community Relations Council of Westchester. So the new name is a return to the group’s roots.

But the WJC gets to keep its initials, which is always nice.

Gary Stern

Gary Stern covered education in the Lower Hudson Valley for several years during the early 1990s. Now's he back on the beat. He believes that schools are one of the main reasons that people live around here and that educational issues -- from curriculum to financing -- are among the most challenging things that journalists can write about. He continues to be amazed by the complexity of educational jargon. Gary got his B.A. at SUNY Buffalo and his M.A. from the University of Missouri Journalism School (where his master's thesis was about the best ways to cover education). He lives in White Plains with his wife and two sons, who attend public schools.