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NYC seminary to host Jewish/Muslim forum

Posted by: Gary Stern - Posted in Interfaith, Jewish, Muslim, NYC, Tolerance on Oct 13, 2010

Just announced: The Jewish Theological Seminary in NYC will host a forum on the Jewish and Muslim experiences in America and how to foster Jewish/Muslim cooperation on Oct. 25.

The 7:30 p.m. program is being sponsored by the seminary (the main seminary of Conservative Judaism), the Islamic Society of North America and Hartford Seminary.

The seminary is hailing the event, called “Judaism and Islam in America Today: Assimilation and Authenticity,” as a “landmark program.”

In 2007, Rabbi Eric Yoffie, head of the Reform Jewish movement, addressed the Islamic Society of North America.

According to a release:

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The participants in the roundtable include Arnold M. Eisen, chancellor of JTS; Sherman Jackson, professor of Islam at the University of Michigan; and Serene Jones, president of Union Theological Seminary. The moderator will be Ingrid Mattson, president of the Islamic Society of North America and director of the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations at Hartford Seminary. The panel will discuss the shared challenges faced by Jews and Muslims who live in this country, focusing on the delicate balance between assimilation into a predominantly secular and Christian society and the desire to retain one’s religious and cultural authenticity.

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When Eisen became chancellor of the seminary a few years ago, he said that one of his priorities would  be to make JTS a center of Jewish/Muslim dialogue. This would appear to be a step in that direction.

The release also says:

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Despite a history of close relationships and religious dialogue spanning more than a millennium, the difficult recent relations between Jews and Muslims have created a degree of mistrust and misunderstanding that many religious and communal leaders are eager to resolve. Both the workshop and public roundtable will offer an opportunity for Jewish, Muslim, and Christian religious leaders to come together and discuss the points of commonality in Jewish and Muslim experience in this country. Participants will also explore ways in which American Jews and Muslims, with all that they share, can work toward better cooperation.

 
 
 
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