Anti-abortion leaders condemn NYC abortion rates

Archbishop Dolan and other religious leaders who oppose abortion held a press conference today to lament abortion rates in NYC.

They said that, based on data released by the NYC Department of Health, 41 percent of all pregnancies ended in abortion in 2009.

That’s 126,774 live births and 87,273 abortions.

Rabbi Chaim Dovid Zwiebel of Agudath Israel of America, an Orthodox group, said: “We’ve been hearing for many years from pro-choice supporters that abortion should be safe, legal and rare. If that’s the goal, we’ve clearly, abysmally failed, especially here in New York City.”

Dolan: “I re-affirm Cardinal John O’Connor’s promise of a quarter-century ago that every woman facing a difficult pregnancy will be provided with free, confidential help of the highest quality from the Archdiocese of New York,” said Archbishop Dolan. “We are prepared to do everything in our power to help you and your unborn baby to make absolutely certain that you need never feel that you have no choice but an abortion.”

According to the stats, released by the anti-abortion Chiaroscuro Foundation, 60 percent of pregnancies for black women ended in abortion.

Reverend Michel Faulkner. “There is something terribly wrong with this picture. As an African American, I cannot passively accept the demise of my community in the name of choice. I choose to stand up and say: ‘why are these numbers so high?’ We did not survive the middle passage and 300 years of Slavery and 100 years of Jim Crow laws to suffer this. I call on every New Yorker to stand for life. We must not allow this trend to continue. New York City is the place where people’s futures begin, not end.”

Gary Stern

Gary Stern covered education in the Lower Hudson Valley for several years during the early 1990s. Now's he back on the beat. He believes that schools are one of the main reasons that people live around here and that educational issues -- from curriculum to financing -- are among the most challenging things that journalists can write about. He continues to be amazed by the complexity of educational jargon. Gary got his B.A. at SUNY Buffalo and his M.A. from the University of Missouri Journalism School (where his master's thesis was about the best ways to cover education). He lives in White Plains with his wife and two sons, who attend public schools.