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PCUSA ends gay-ordination ban, continuing long debate

Posted by: Gary Stern - Posted in Gay clergy debate, Gay ordination, Presbyterian Church (USA) on May 11, 2011

Way back in 1997, I wrote an article about the “strong possibility” that Presbyterian Church (USA) could split over the question of whether noncelibate gays and lesbians could be ordained.

The denomination had just amended church law to ban ordination for anyone who wasn’t married or chaste. Liberal congregations and even regions threatened to bolt the denomination.

The debate over gay ordination has remained fierce since then. Some individual congregations have left the denomination and PCUSA’s overall membership has continued to slide.

But liberal Presbyterians did not break away en masse, as many expected.

Now conservatives within PCUSA are the ones who may threaten to leave.

The amendment to church law that required clergy to be married or chaste is being stricken, replaced by a general call for governing bodies within the denomination to be “guided by Scripture and the confessions in applying standards to individual candidates.”

A majority of PCUSA’s 173 regional presbyteries had to approve the change, which was proposed by the denomination’s General Assembly last summer. Yesterday, the Presbytery of Twin Cities Area became the 87th presbytery to approve a change, sealing a majority.

The change will go into effect July 10.

Now what?

Who knows? I’m not as quick to believe that a chunk of congregations will seek to break away, although it’s likely that a stream of conservative congregations will make noises about leaving and some will actually do it.

But it seems quite possible that PCUSA will continue to slowly shrink—like other mainline denominations—as liberals, conservatives and moderates continue to ignore or get along with each other.

A letter from the denomination to members includes this:

*****

Reactions to this change will span a wide spectrum. Some will rejoice, while others will weep. Those who rejoice will see the change as an action, long in coming, that makes the PC(USA) an inclusive church that recognizes and receives the gifts for ministry of all those who feel called to ordained office. Those who weep will consider this change one that compromises biblical authority and acquiesces to present culture. The feelings on both sides run deep.

However, as Presbyterians, we believe that the only way we will find God’s will for the church is by seeking it together – worshiping, praying, thinking, and serving alongside one another. We are neighbors and colleagues, friends and family. Most importantly, we are all children of God, saved and taught by Jesus Christ, and filled with the Holy Spirit.

*****

The letter also asks Presbyterians to say this prayer:

*****

Almighty God, we give thanks for a rich heritage of faithful witnesses to the gospel throughout the ages. We offer gratitude not only for those who have gone before us, but for General Assembly commissioners and presbyters across the church who have sought diligently to discern the mind of Christ for the church in every time and place, and especially in this present time.

May your Spirit of peace be present with us in difficult decisions, especially where relationships are strained and the future is unclear. Open our ears and our hearts to listen to and hear those with whom we differ. Most of all, we give thanks for Jesus Christ, our risen Savior and Lord, who called the Church into being and who continues to call us to follow his example of loving our neighbor and working for the reconciliation of the world. We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen.

 
 
 
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3 Responses to “PCUSA ends gay-ordination ban, continuing long debate”


  1. Matthew Ray

    This is something that most mainline denominations have already faced, or will soon. As a PC(USA) member, I believe that this decision was a wise one. In the Presbyterian system, local bodies (called presbyteries) determine ordination. Local churches are then free to call ministers from this pool, or accept transfers from other presbyteries. Having a statement that affirms the reform tradition, while allowing these bodies leeway in deciding who can be candidates for ordination makes sense. In addtion, as a gay man, I believe that this is one more step towards a church that is welcoming and inclusive. I think the end result will be increased freedom, a few churches leaving, and growth based on this decision.

  2. Daryl gessner

    I truly believe that the church should be open for everyone. For aren’t we all sinners in the eyes of the lord? However the bible is clear about who should be ordained. If you are a praticing sinner who does not repent, then you should not be a spiritual leader. This goes for an adultery, habitual lying, habitual drinking or substance abuse, porn addiction, and yes homosexuality. If the bible has clear expectations, it is our job to follow them and not lead other a stray.

  3. Daryl gessner

    It is also more important to follow the Tenants of the bible then to worry about how popular we are. We are suppose to be god’s laws and let him worry about church attendance.



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