Remember the King’s College?

This and that:

1. Those who have been around for a while might remember when the King’s College — an evangelical school — was located in Briarcliff Manor. The college shut down in 1994 because of financial problems, leading to a long stalemate over how the campus should be used (it’s now a luxury senior housing development).

The King’s College reopened a few years later in the Empire State Building of all places.

New York magazine recently caught up with the school and its new president, the conservative political and social commentator Dinesh D’Souza. The article covers the college’s mission to engage its secular opponents and to train Christians for careers in politics, finance, the media, etc.

It focuses, though, on D’Souza and whether his “pointed” views may be too much even for the King’s College.

The writer, Andrew Marantz, describes how D’Souza tells a group of students and others about the “unique villainy of Barack Obama.” D’Souza offers this: “For Obama, the radical Muslims are on the right side of history—that’s why he is so unnaturally solicitous toward them.”

One can only wonder which radical Muslims the college president is referring to. Must not be those who have been the targets of all those drone attacks in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

2. The NYTimes writes today about plans slowly moving ahead for that Islamic center two blocks from Ground Zero.

Remember the Islamic center? I think it was a pretty big story just about a year ago.

Anyway, the main developer is moving much slower to build networks of support and decide what to do with the place. This is how the planning should have been done to start with.

If you remember, opponents of the “Ground Zero mosque” were attacking the place last year before there was any staff, money or plans. The few people involved were caught totally off-guard and essentially froze instead of explaining themselves and their intentions.

3. The Times also writes today about an Islamist insurgent group blocking aid to starving people in Somalia.

When I was reading the article, it struck me that this would be a good time for American Muslim groups to condemn what these people are doing, supposedly in the name of Islam.

When Americans call on Muslims to denounce terrorism, this is what they mean.

Have you heard there are plans for a mosque near Ground Zero?

Back from vacation. A good (and sunny time) was had by all.

I’ll share my beach reading list in a day or two.

When I left, the GROUND ZERO MOSQUE controversy was a big story. Not it is a BIG STORY.

The Boston Globe and Portland Press Herald — yes, I was in Maine — had coverage every day. And it seems that every politician and interest group in the country has had something to say about whether the Islamic community center should be built.

What’s going on here? Lots of things, of course.

There seems to be a legitimate question of whether an Islamic center two blocks from Ground Zero is simply too much — symbolically — for those who lost loved ones on 9/11 or otherwise had their lives changed forever. If a survivor feels that a mosque in that location would be inappropriate, who is to tell her (or him) that they are wrong?

The “They can build it, but not there” camp seems to be growing.

At the same time, this whole debate/controversy has revealed a deep anti-Muslim antipathy that some would like to take mainstream.

Many protesters make generalizations about Muslims or Islamic practice that show that we’ve learned little about a faith followed by 1.3 billion people. A Brooklyn plumber who attended yesterday’s anti-mosque rally has been widely quoted as saying that the people behind the project are “the same people who took down the twin towers.”

The whole debate is a classic example of a truism of public relations: “If you don’t define yourself, someone else will.”

As I’ve written before, the man behind the mosque proposal — Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf — and his advisers have done a terrible job of explaining themselves.

They seem to have not realized that their plans would provoke opposition.

They’ve done and said almost nothing to explain who they are — truly moderate Muslims — and why their project would be good for New York.

It’s almost hard to believe that Rauf is currently in the Middle East, representing the U.S. State Department, as his good name gets torn apart at home. Who’s running the show?

A terrific article in today’s Washington Post outlines Rauf’s utter failure at P.R.:

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So far, debate has been framed around whether a $100 million, 15-story Muslim community center and mosque should be built two blocks from where Islamic radicals brought down the World Trade Center. But interviews with people who know Rauf suggest that the project isn’t much more than an idea and that Rauf’s most controversial trait may be his ambition.

While he portrays himself as someone who runs two influential interfaith nonprofits (his Web site says he is “regarded as one of the world’s most eloquent and erudite Muslim leaders”), neither one has a staff, and the project that has inspired outrage hasn’t even begun fundraising, said Rauf’s wife and work partner, Daisy Khan.

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I’ve interviewed Rauf several times and believe that most Americans would like him if they got to know him.

But it’s probably too late for that.

Rauf and his wife, Daisy, needed to do an hour on Oprah.

Instead, they let a bunch of politicians introduce them to America.

(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Most New Yorkers oppose downtown Islamic cultural center, poll shows

Sixty one percent of New Yorkers oppose the so-called “Ground Zero mosque,” according to a poll released today by the Siena College Research Institute in Loudonville, N.Y.

Institute Director Don Levy says: “Large majorities of all New Yorkers, every party, region and age give a thumbs-down to the Cordoba House Mosque being built near the Ground Zero site. But only just over half of all New Yorkers, even city residents say they have been following the news about the proposed mosque closely.”

By “New Yorkers,” he’s talking about people across the state, not only people in the NYC region.

Here’s the rest of Levy’s comments:

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Two of ten New Yorkers agree more with supporters that say the proposed Cultural Center would demonstrate the presence of moderate Muslims and serve as a monument to religious tolerance than with opponents that say the project is an offense to the memory of those killed in the attacks on 9/11 and that it displays unacceptable insensitivity.  Nearly four in ten agree more with the opponents and 38 percent think both sides have a legitimate case.  Over half of all New Yorkers and NYC residents either agree that the project would promote tolerance or are, at least, willing to listen.

But when it comes to a yes or no vote, more than a quarter of those that agree with the supporters, nearly half of those that see both sides and virtually all of those that question the appropriateness of the Mosque currently vote ‘No’ on the project.

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The Institute also said that 52 percent of New Yorkers would favor an immigration law like the one passed in Arizona.

Other findings on immigration, according to a release:

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Seventy percent of New York residents say that the presence of 10 to 20 million illegal immigrants poses a somewhat (30%) or very significant (40%) problem to the U.S.,  and large majorities call for comprehensive immigration reform that would include enhanced border security (79%), the creation of a process for admitting legal temporary workers (70%), and implementing a tough but fair path to legalization for those already here (65%).